Cellular Memories

By 17th May 2017KEY ARTICLES
Cellular Memoriess

Cellular Memories ±

Published on 17th May, 2017
Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
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I was communicating with our UK Lawyers and Accountants a few days ago and wrote the following:-

“It was good speaking with you last week. I am still working on the brief and I apologise for the delay in the same, as my concentration and memory is really bad at present.

Regrettably I am feeling really low because 18 May 2017 is the 4yr Anniversary of the Heart Attack which occurred during the Intentionally Inflicted Emotional Distress (“IIED”) of Edward de Saram (“EDS”) when I was in Singapore.

Additionally 19 May 2017 is the 3yr Anniversary of another Heart Attack and the visit to the Coronary Care Unit at Asiri Surgical Hospital in Sri Lanka which confirmed that I had Coronary Artery Ectasia and that my life would be forever different.

Around this time of year I always feel low – perhaps certain traumatic events are indelibly etched on a victim’s mind and the body. In any event life goes on so I need a few more days to prepare various materials and thank you for bearing with me :)”

What is Cellular Memory?

The concept I was referring to when I wrote ‘indelibly etched’ referred to the concept of Cellular Memory.

The following article is absolutely fascinating:-

Memory in the Flesh: Can memories survive outside the brain?

After performing controversial memory experiments in the ‘50s and ‘60s, psychologist James V. McConnell’s reputation never recovered. His proposal — that memories could live on outside the brain —...

The cells in our bodies can divide as often as once every 24 hours, creating a new, identical copy. DNA binding proteins called transcription factors are required for maintaining cell identity. They ensure that daughter cells have the same function as their mother cell, so that for example muscle cells can contract or pancreatic cells can produce insulin.

However, each time a cell divides the specific binding pattern of the transcription factors is erased and has to be restored in both mother and daughter cells. Previously it was unknown how this process works, but now scientists at Karolinska Institutet have discovered the importance of particular protein rings encircling the DNA and how these function as the cell’s memory.

Cell memory mechanism discovered

DNA binding proteins called transcription factors are required for maintaining cell identity. They ensure that daughter cells have the same function as their mother cell. However, each time a cell divides the specific binding pattern of the...

Histones

Understanding cell memory – University of Copenhagen

Histones are proteins that are tightly bound to the genetic material, our DNA. Histones carry information that determines cell type and cell properties, collectively termed cell identity, by controlling which genes are turned off and on. Understanding how information in histones is inherited every time our cells divide, is fundamental to explain how cell identity is remembered and daughter...

Sustaining Memory

Research in cellular memory

How do fetal cells know what cell types to become? Why do cells in the adult body sometimes forget what they are and develop into cancer cells? These are some of the questions intensively investigated within the research field of epigenetics. Danish epigenetic research has a very strong position internationally and one of the players is Associate Professor Anja Groth from BRIC, University of Copenhagen. She has just received an ERC Starting Grant and has been selected for EMBO's ...

Organ Transplants

One of the most interesting and/or disturbing effects of cellular memory is when the recipients of an organ transplant go through a personality change.

A Change of Heart - Claire Sylvia

A Change of Heart is the amazing true story of one woman’s journey to the outer limits of medicine and the spirit. To save her life from a rare lung disease, Claire Sylvia underwent a heart-and-lung transplant. Her chest was sawed open, her diseased organs cut out, and in their place were grafted the heart and lungs of an eighteen-year-old man who had just died in a motorcycle accident.

When she survived the surgery, she was sure that her great adventure was finally over. In fact, it was just beginning. Even as she lay recovering in Intensive Care, Claire began to feel the presence of something or someone else within her. At first terrified and then fascinated, she soon noticed that her attitudes, habits, and tastes had changed. She had inexplicable cravings for food she had previously disliked. She found herself drawn toward cool colors and no longer dressed in the vibrant reds and oranges she used to love. And she started behaving with an aggressiveness and impetuosity she had previously never shown.

Five months after the operation she had a remarkable dream in which she met a young man named Tim L., a man she absolutely knew was her donor. Thus began the second part of Claire’s miraculous journey – to confirm whether or not the new personality within her was actually that of her donor.

Along the way, she struggled with profound and timeless questions: Where does body end and spirit begin? Is it possible to live on after death? How does one learn to accept this awesome gift? In a deeply moving and dramatic encounter, Claire finally meets the “family of my heart, ” finds some of the answers she had been looking for, and comes to understand the surprising bequest of love from the dead to the living.

A Change of Heart

A Change of Heart is the amazing true story of one woman's journey to the outer limits of medicine and the spirit. To save her life from a rare lung disease, Claire Sylvia underwent a heart-and-lung transplant. Her chest was sawed open, her diseased organs cut out, and in their place were grafted the heart and lungs of an eighteen-year-old man who had just died in a motorcycle accident.

Changes in Blood Group

This is quite an incredible example of Cellular Memory:-

Australian girl changes blood group, immune system

CANBERRA (Reuters) - An Australian teenage girl has become the world’s first known transplant patient to change blood groups and take on the immune system of her organ donor, doctors said on Friday, calling her a “one-in-six-billion miracle.”

Harvard Medical School

Stem Cell Memory

Researchers suppressed the CAF1 gene to create colonies of induced pluripotent stem cell at greater speeds and efficiencies. Image: Sihem Chaloufi Researchers suppressed the CAF1 gene to create colonies of induced pluripotent stem cell at greater speeds and efficiencies. Image: Sihem Chaloufi

Assassin's Creed

So Why Am I Completely Different to My Family/Relations?

The answer is related to Nature v Nurture – my genes are from my parents and/or aliens (!) but I spent my formative years in the UK. As such there are fundamental differences there which are fairly obvious.

However the question is why is my sister’s behaviour closer to my parents than me? Surely Tania and I have been brought up in Western Culture, within a similar environment?

The answer is that due to my Hyperthymestic Memory and Eidetic Memory types, there is a massive volume of new material which is coming in and all of it is stored.

Cells have a limited amount of space to store information and over a period of time my cells’ ‘historic dna’ have been replaced by my ‘neoteric dna’. And my new thoughts increase synaptic strength which is concept of synaptic plasticity which I referred to.

Unfortunately when there is significant trauma, all that information is coded permanently. There is no way of preventing its storage.

However my continual revisiting and reprocessing of the trauma reduces the risk of [long-term] PTSD. In my case rather than ‘taking a break’ I should do ‘exactly what I was doing before’, however stressful my life becomes, to ensure that the old memories are continually processed/re-analysed and new memories are continually formed.

And this is another reason that I put various items of forensic evidence on LinkedIn – it confirms that I am not the one with the problem and it also encourages other victims of crime to come forward – without them the perpetrators would continually go unpunished.

Of course it is difficult to do this, but unless we start standing up and documenting the trauma, it is a battle we will always fight alone…

Joseph-S-R-de-Saram

Joseph S R de Saram (JSRDS)

Information Security Architect / Intelligence Analyst / Computer Scientist / Human Rights Activist / COMSEC / SIGINT / TSCM
RHODIUM GROUP

Other articles in the series:-

Thanks for the Memories

"We must never forget the lessons of the past in our quest for the future." - JSRDS Baby's First Words Thoughts not words in my case - one of my...

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Following on from my other article:- I continue the voyage into the mind and examine particular situations or disorders which prevent it...

Memory Loss in Trauma and Otherwise

Memory loss, also known as amnesia, is unusual forgetfulness. It may affect the ability to recall new events or to remember events in the past - or...

Memory Deficits in Schizophrenia

THERE ARE ALWAYS OBSERVABLE/TESTABLE MEMORY DEFICITS IN PATIENTS WHO GENUINELY SUFFER FROM SCHIZOPHRENIA. IF THERE ARE NO MEMORY DEFICITS THEN IT IS...